May 25, 2020

Self-Isolation Hymn



Self-Isolation Hymn
Galkin has really revved up his creative abilities. Screen shot Galkin via Instagram

Russian comedian Maxim Galkin is at it again. The husband of the famous singer Alla Pugacheva took on a new project during quarantine: writing a song about the difficulties of quarantine. But simply writing and singing a song wasn’t enough for this comedy lion: he also dressed up in a Batman suit and sung the song while posing near a statue of an undressed Batman.

The video, posted to Galkin’s Instagram account, is labeled “Self-Isolation Hymn.” In the song, Galkin parodies some of the difficulties of staying at home: “A cake, dumplings, also potatoes - and then the sofa cracked beneath me.” Galkin’s wife, Alla Pugacheva, also has a cameo in the video. She appears on a balcony in black gloves, reaching out towards her husband but unable to reach him.

In just a few hours, the video had over 400,000 views. In the commentary, many people commented on the comedian’s amazing singing voice.

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