February 10, 2020

Protect your Pets



Protect your Pets
Don't mess with these pets! Image by huoadg5888 via Pixabay

A resident of Moscow is being charged for killing a cat. According to police, the resident was drunk and killed a cat in front of his son, throwing the body out of a second-story window. The 32-year old man is being charged with animal abuse.

Unfortunately this isn’t the only recent case of animal abuse. On January 27, the police were called in Udmurtia to stop a man from attacking a dog with an axe. The dog was saved and given to new owners. The original owner is being charged with animal abuse and faces over a year in prison.

Meanwhile, an adopted dog went missing in Sakhalin. The people who adopted the dog said they wanted her to guard their grandfather’s house, however, it would appear they had different plans for the dog. Volunteers searched for the dog, but the address provided by the adoptive parents was fake. Eventually volunteers were able to track down the pair, only to discover that they had eaten the dog by cooking her into a soup. Volunteers from the animal shelter are calling for the couple to be prosecuted for animal abuse.

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