September 08, 2020

Pay with Your Face



Pay with Your Face
Moscow's metro now has a new video system. Image by W. Bulach via Wikimedia Commons

Moscow’s Department of Transport recently announced the launch of a new video surveillance system in all the city’s metro stations. The system began operations on September first. This video system is the first step to introducing FacePay – a way to pay for transportation with a scan of the passenger’s face.

According to the Department of Transport’s press release, “Now we are testing it with our banking partners. We plan to complete one of the test stages by October 1 and we will tell you right away about the interim results.” A similar system is already in place and being tested in London’s metro.

In addition to implementing FacePay, the Department says that the video surveillance system will also track how full train cars are. This will allow passengers to choose the least crowded train car, which is especially important, given the current epidemiological conditions.

Tags: videometro
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