December 03, 2021

On Being a Good Sport


On Being a Good Sport
More professional than your average bar fight. Photo by Dan Burton via Unsplash

In conjunction with the Russian Boxing Federation, the Russian Ministry of Sports has decided to officially categorize bare-knuckle boxing as a sporting discipline. This will allow the agency to put stricter regulations on how, when, and in what manner the notoriously chaotic sport will be practiced in the future. 

As a new and official sport, bare-knuckle fighters or announcers will no longer be allowed to use vulgar language during tournaments (bummer!). The object here is to elevate people's perceptions of the sport and to hopefully make it into something someday that people can appreciate as a respected and competitive skill-based challenge. 

Another change will regard the regulation and enforcement of doping protocol. Officials of the Ministry of Sports said that the new sport will be held to the same standards regarding the use of illegal substances as other sports (not that that necessarily means very much).

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