August 25, 2020

Nothing Suspicious Here...



Nothing Suspicious Here...
If you're not a fan of Putin, it might be best to go for coffee instead. Public domain

One of Russia's most famous anti-corruption activists and Kremlin critics, Alexei Navalny, fell victim to a mysterious illness last week, suspected to be a poisoning.

Navalny fell ill while on a flight to Moscow from the Siberian city of Tomsk last week, reportedly after drinking tea in the airport. While Russian hospitals' investigations were inconclusive, the Berlin hospital where Navalny is currently recovering in a coma has ruled the illness as poison-induced.

His condition is reportedly still serious, but stable.

The Kremlin, of course, has downplayed the incident, with spokesman Dmitri Peskov saying that doctors were "rushing" to the conclusion of poisoning. "There must be a reason for an investigation. For the moment, all you and I see is that the patient is in a coma," he is reported commenting.

This is not the first time tea has been used as a vector for poisoning; in 2006, a former Russian agent living in London was killed by the same method.

 

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