September 07, 2020

Murder, He Meowed


Murder, He Meowed
Working hard, or hardly working? TverNews.ru

The rural Gorodenskaya library in Tver Oblast has lost its most famous employee.

Stepan, a local cat who had spent nearly every day at the library, didn't show up one morning last week. In the words of a local paper, "he had never allowed himself to miss work for so long before." It was soon discovered that he had been killed by a neighbor of his owner, who accused Stepan of using the building's entrance as his personal toilet (we aren't making this up).

Regardless of the manner of his death, Stepan will be missed at the library, where he was well-known and liked by both children and adults, as well as by library staff, who gave him the necessary documentation. Stepan spent his days greeting patrons and participating in library events, but spent the nights with his owner, who lived across the street. He brought a certain level of fame to the small library, and his murder has made international headlines.

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