September 01, 2020

Moscow's Last Trolleybus Line



Moscow's Last Trolleybus Line
Public transportation in Moscow is getting an upgrade. Image by EPr-666 via Pixabay

Anyone who has been to Moscow has likely experienced the city’s effective public transportation, from its beautiful metro stations to the small but efficient marshrutka routes. However, there is one mode of transportation that has long been popular in Russia, but that will no longer be used widely in Moscow: trolleybuses.

Trolleybuses in Moscow are being replaced with electric buses beginning August 25. All trolleybus routes will be replaced with electric buses except for one: between Komsomolskaya Square and Novoryazanskaya Street.

This route will remain serviced with trolleybuses, in an homage to the mode of transportation’s importance in Russia. This route was not chosen at random: in June 1937, the city's trolleybus fleet was launched at Novoryazanskaya Street. Moreover, there will soon be a Moscow Transportation Museum in this area, where visitors will be able to see historic trolleybuses. As a nod to trolleybuses’ history, retro trolleybuses will run along the remaining route.

According to Leonid Antonov, general director of Moscow’s Mosgortrans, which oversees all bus, trolleybus, and tram lines, the number of electric buses is constantly growing. There are currently 450 electric buses, with a goal of 600 by the end of the year. More than 2,600 are planned by 2024.

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