June 11, 2021

Kicking It to Katyusha



Kicking It to Katyusha
What a kick! Movers take over a piano in Moscow at the end of May / Screenshot from ViralHog's video on Youtube

When one lucky Muscovite heard a ruckus outside his apartment window in late May, he peered out to catch sight of four movers wheeling a piano on a dolly.

Beneath clusters of lilac, three of the men shifted the instrument to a better position while the fourth adjusted himself in front of the piano’s keys. To the delight of his coworkers – the gentleman to the right of the musician kicked straight into a jig, cigarette in hand – the pianist launched into “Katyusha,” a Soviet-era song sung from the perspective of a young woman whose love has gone off to war.

And such a sight it was! Four grown men in bright orange jackets swerving and laughing along to a war song, so caught up they nearly lost the piano’s lid.

All ended well as the quartet halted, readjusted, and set forth to fulfill their duty. Watch the video of the impish pianist and his crew below.

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