June 29, 2020

Keep the Line, Lose the Shoe



Keep the Line, Lose the Shoe
Whatever you do, don't break the line. Image by The Presidential Press and Information Office via Wikimedia Commons

 

A parade in Kaliningrad honoring the 75th anniversary of Victory in World War II went a little off schedule for one participant. A female soldier marching in the parade lost her shoe. Despite this setback, she continued on and did not break the line while marching, managing to maintain formation.

Representatives from the Baltic Fleet also took part in the parade, and their commander, Alexander Nosatov, noted the woman’s action and asked that she be brought forward. He stated, “I especially want to note the woman who lost her shoe. Please introduce her to me, and I will separately reward her, because, having lost her shoe, she did not break formation and no one even noticed.”

The Victory Day parades were moved from May 9 to June 24 on the order of President Putin, due to the situation with the coronavirus pandemic. June 24 was selected because, on that date in 1945, there was a parade honoring the soldiers who fought in World War II, and the soldiers themselves walked across Red Square, according to President Putin.

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