December 26, 2019

Kazan Witnesses Transgender Marriage



Kazan Witnesses Transgender Marriage

Kazan, capital of the Russian republic of Tatarstan, witnessed the marriage of a transgender couple.

The bride, Erika, said that they encountered no problems because they had already changed their appearance to look like a traditional man and woman, and received new documents that reflect their gender identity. It is unknown whether this is the first case of transgender persons getting married in Russia, though the bride said she has heard of others.

First came love, when the couple met two months ago, then came marriage, and soon may come a baby in a baby carriage – the newlyweds are planning to stay in Kazan for now, but may later move to Europe and adopt a child.

A special shout out to the Russian media, which used their correct pronouns.

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