October 19, 2020

How Much Money Do Russians Need?



How Much Money Do Russians Need?
How much money does it take to be happy? Image by Petar Milošević via Wikimedia Commons

Money can’t buy happiness, but many Russians may disagree. A recent survey conducted by Otkritiye Bank and Rosgosstrakh Life Insurance Company asked Russians what they need to be happy.

The results showed that half of Russians say they are happy if they have a worthwhile job. This was an especially popular opinion in the Urals and Siberia, with 56 and 57 percent, respectively. On the other hand, 26 percent said they would have a happy life if they had “a lot of money.” This was a key criterion for happiness in the Volga and Northern Caucasus regions. Overall, 43 percent of Russians surveyed said they would like to be paid ten times more in order to feel happier, and eight percent said they need a million dollars to be happy.

The average paycheck for Russians is calculated at R60,000 (approximately $770) per month. Those surveyed said a paycheck in the range of R100,000-150,000 ($1,288-1,932) is sufficient for happiness, although in Moscow the rate rises to R150,000-300,000 ($1,932-3,864).

Respondents were between 18-65 years old and the survey was conducted from October 9-12 in cities with a population of over 100,000 people.

Tags: Moscowmoney
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