January 01, 2020

Happy New Year! Enjoy Your Bath!



Happy New Year! Enjoy Your Bath!
The mayor's office response to this penis-shaped ice rink in Novosibirsk: "Real art should excite you!" Govorit Moskva | Telegram

“People discussed whether Nadya and Ippolit had sex.”

– One of the FAQ’s about the beloved Soviet New Year’s film Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, according to the daughter of the director. 

Unfortunately for Russia, UNESCO refused to accept the iconic film Irony of Fate, along with other Russian New Year’s traditions – like visiting the banya on December 31st (a key component of the film) and Salad Olivye – as items of intangible cultural heritage. Maybe they’ll have better luck next year, if Russia actually ratifies UNESCO’s convention on protecting items of intangible cultural heritage. In the meantime, we hope all Russians still enjoyed their New Year’s baths!

In addition to mayonnaise-based salads, Russians met the New Year with pastry-shaped ornaments and a penis-shaped ice rink. Unlike skating rinks and Irony of Fate, though, New Year’s icons Ded Moroz (Father Frost) and his helper Snegorochka remained solidly PG. Officials in St. Petersburg did not let the two fairy-tale characters get married

Ded Moroz and Snegorochka wedding
They were denied because they were not dressed for the occasion. But she is still wearing a white dress! / Fontanka.ru

Most importantly, Russians met the New Year with their family, the life priority of 90% of Russians. 

We wish you a New Year full of family – and happiness, health, and all the other things to which Russians love to toast.

С новым годом! 

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