May 23, 2020

Do Bears Attack in the Woods?



Do Bears Attack in the Woods?
When bears stray from their habitat... Image by Alan Vernon via Wikimedia Commons

There is a stereotype about Russia that bears roam the streets there. This week in Yaroslavl, that stereotype came to life, as a bear roamed the streets of a sleepy suburb. Residents posted on social media about the presence of a bear walking along the tram lines in the city's Dzerzhinsky district.

This wasn’t all, however, as unfortunately, the bear attacked a man as part of his venture through the city. The man was saved by a taxi driver, who began beeping the horn and flashing his signals to distract and scare away the bear. The taxi driver then took the man to a local hospital, where he was treated for a hip wound.

The taxi driver was awarded for his bravery by the taxi company, although he said he was just acting as anyone in that situation (who happened to be in a car) should. The bear did not meet such a promising fate: because he continued to stay in the city and wouldn’t return to the forest, authorities were forced to put the bear down.

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