March 02, 2020

Crowdfunded $2.3 Million Will Save a Child



Crowdfunded $2.3 Million Will Save a Child
The five-month-old may not be able to talk yet, but her family can say “donation collection is closed” and “Thank you!” for her. Ovechkinaalice | Instagram

A family in Yekaterinburg raised 153 million rubles ($2.3 million) for medicine needed by their five-month-old daughter with spinal muscular atrophy. $440,000 came from a single anonymous donor.

The family used social media, live television and flashmobs to raise funds and awareness. The baby’s name is Alisa, and the fact that they succeeded in raising so much money is rather Alice-in-Wonderland magical. Fittingly, the parents called the anonymous donor that gave the final $440,000 a “super-magician.”

Crowdfunding for medical bills of children is not uncommon in Russia; news sites such as lenta.ru and television programs frequently feature calls for help, and donors can send money by text to the parents. Indeed, Russians are at their most generous when the lives of children are at stake. 

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