June 23, 2021

Crossing the Line



Crossing the Line
This crosses a line. Youtube

"If you want it done right, then do it yourself." Perhaps nobody takes this old saying quite to heart the way Russian babushkas do. This is particularly true of one pensioner in Biysk, who grew so tired of waiting for her city to repaint the stripes on a crosswalk that she decided to take matters into her own hands. 

With a rag and a bucket of paint, you can see the 69-year-old woman painting the street in this video that spread widely on social media. Upon seeing the video, the city department responsible for road maintenance quickly responded, saying that they would come by to make sure the lines were repainted in the approved manner within three days.

Thankfully, the city is choosing not to press charges for vandalism or hooliganism, but rather chooses to see that, while her painting might have been done with a shaky hand, her intentions were good. Perhaps they should consider installing electric crosswalks, which do not require citizens to repaint them by hand, but yet again, maybe it is better that they do not. 

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