February 16, 2022

Crimes Against Hu-mine-ity


Crimes Against Hu-mine-ity
Don't go playing with fire, real or virtual. Flickr user Bill Sung

A teenager from Kansk, Russia, has been sentenced to 5 years in prison for "undergoing training in order to carry out terrorist activities." The (supposedly) heinous things that this teenager has done include: playing with homemade firecrackers, hanging posters around town, and destroying a model of FSB offices in Minecraft.

16-year-old Nikita Uvarov was detained two years ago along with two friends for hanging posters in support of Azat Miftakhov. Uvarov was the only one of the three boys to be charged, as his two friends were released for aiding with the investigation.

After arresting the teenagers, law enforcement officers found evidence in the boys' group chats that they had built an FSB building in MInecraft and were planning on blowing it up. (Kids and their darn video games!) They also found out that the boys had been playing with homemade firecrackers in abandoned buildings.

Although it is doubtful whether Uvarov deserves to be sent to prison for his antics (and let's be honest, who didn't get up to trouble as a teenager?), we can only hope that he will make the most of his time behind bars.

 

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