May 14, 2021

Beastly Benefits



Beastly Benefits
Pensions aren't just for people anymore.  Photo by Golnar S. Rashidi via pexels.com

When the show can no longer go on, animal members of the Russian State Circus will now be given the opportunity to retire in style in cozy Crimea.

Recently, the Taigan Safari Park in Crimea has agreed to take on all retired circus animals from the Russian State Circus.  Some elephants have already packed their trunks and moved into their new facility, but the program hopes to take in other creatures soon. 

It's nice to see some change in the way Russian circuses are treating animals. Prior to this agreement, "retired" circus animals who were not able to be placed in zoos would remain in the custody of the circus, traveling along with their caretakers even though they themselves were no longer performing.

This should also hopefully allow more animals a chance to recuperate in a more suitable environment and climate

Although, if anyone's looking for a lion-tamer, we've got you covered.

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