July 29, 2022

An Attempt to Reason


An Attempt to Reason
Stop the war, but don't stop me. Kremlin.Ru

Saying he fears the Russian invasion of Ukraine could devolve into nuclear war, Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko has called on Moscow, Kyiv, and Ukraine's Western allies to reach an agreement to end the war.

While the Kremlin has claimed that it will not use nuclear weapons unless there is an "existential threat," three days after the start of the invasion President Vladimir Putin ordered Russia’s nuclear deterrent forces to be put on alert.

Interestingly, even though the war was initiated by unilateral Russian aggression, Lukashenko said he believes it is the responsibility of Ukraine to end the war.

Along with blaming Ukraine and its Western allies for fomenting the invasion, Lukashenko has allowed Russian forces to use Belarus (which shares a border with Ukraine) as a military base and transit route for the invasion.

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