May 31, 2021

A Necessary Inspection


A Necessary Inspection
A Simple-Dimple AndLikeThings, Wikimedia commons

On May 21, Russia’s Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing, also known as Rospotrebnadzor, ordered research on the effect of “Squishies” and “Simple-Dimples” on Russian children.

Children have taken a liking to this type of toy, made to be squeezed or pressed with a finger, which is also used in therapy for people with neurological disorders. When in a state of stress, patients make clicking sounds and repetitive movements with the toys in response to a stimulus.

In 2017 Rospotrebnadzor also sought to understand the impact of fidget spinners, another knickknack that gained wild popularity among youth of various ages. The organization found that spinners have no effect on the youth psyche, although they can be dangerous due to their small parts.

One wonders whether officials at Rospotrebnadzor have had time to get to the bottom of the matryoshka.

 

 

 

 

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