March 22, 2020

A Lost Civilization in Russia's South



A Lost Civilization in Russia's South
Don't you just hate it when you're building a road and accidentally uncover a lost civilization? Institute of Archaeology, Russian Academy of Sciences

Working from home is tough for archaeologists. But it's a good thing for us history buffs.

Road construction in Russia's South, near the city of Pyatigorsk, has unearthed a settlement dating to the Iron Age. According to scientists, who have begun extensive excavation at the site, the complex of buildings dates to between the ninth and seventh centuries BC. Archaeologists have uncovered a fortified area, several buildings, and a variety of artifacts, including tools and household items.

Work on the road will be diverted to preserve the historic site.

The area is famed for its mineral waters; our guess is that this settlement is a 2500-year-old Russian sanatorium.

Last year, a settlement of the legendary Amazons was uncovered and yielded some incredible finds.

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