January 01, 2024

Wishing on a Tsar


Wishing on a Tsar
New Year: A time of magic (and wishful thinking) The Russian Life files

A recent study reported by Izevestia reveals what 2,537 school-age Russians and their parents are wishing for in the coming new year.

The top wish among parents is for a vacation (21%), followed closely by their child's academic success in upcoming exams (20%). From there, 11% want a work promotion, 9% home updates, and 7% a raise.

Among youngsters, 40% wish for better grades. In second place, 34% hope for success in standardized tests, 17% want new gadgets, and 15% are looking for more independence through a part-time job.

The top hope for 2023 was also for a getaway (36%). However, the study also related that only 32% of respondents felt like they'd achieved their goals; 47% said they'd only achieved them partially. On the positive side, though, a measly 3% said they'd failed to achieve their goals at all.

Given the craziness of 2022 and 2023, though, we'd settle for an unambitious 2024.

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