February 02, 2017

Blogging Bears, Ivan the Terrible Rapper, and a Blob


Blogging Bears, Ivan the Terrible Rapper, and a Blob

Things that don't quite belong

1. Many folks dream of traveling the globe. Apparently, so do polar bears. This bear-faced tourist has been from Tonga to Thailand, Ethiopia to Ecuador, but it’s his permanent habitat on Instagram that helped him taste the honey of fame. The man behind the mask is Elnar Mansurov, a Perm resident who has gained attention as a travel expert – and not just for his unconventional facewear, but also for his tips about traveling with bearly any money. If a bear can do it, anything’s pawsible.

the-village.ru

2. A genre of teaching is born: the rap lecture. A history teacher at the Higher School of Economics gave a lecture titled "The external and internal policies of the Moscow State from the reign of Ivan the Great to the Time of Troubles," and he did it in rhyme and on beat. (Well, mostly). On the one hand, don’t make bets with students lightly. On the other, what better way to learn about 15th-century Russia? Find the full 40 minutes here. Jay-Z better watch out.

3. A new creature – part elephant, part seal, part blob from another planet – has made its way into Russian hearts and memes. Christened Zhdun, the creature was originally a sculpture meant to represent people waiting at the doctor’s office. But the little guy (or girl) has since taken off in social media, appearing in classical art, Kremlin press conferences, casinos, and scenes from history. Next thing you know, it’ll be Zhdun for president.

meduza.io

In Odder News

  • Tattoos are old news: a dental patient in Moscow got portraits of Presidents Putin and Trump engraved on his teeth. That’s one way to crown your heroes.
rbth.com
  • If you’ve ever wondered what types of photos an American spy in the Soviet Union would take, now you’ve got an album as an answer.
  • Ligers are real. They’re bigger than both lions and tigers. And there’s a baby one in Russia named Tsar.

Quote of the Week

"I decided to invest in the experiences, because that is the hardest form of currency."   
—Eldar Mansurov, otherwise known as Misha the bear-tourist, on his decision to spend his money on travel. Of his decision to wear a bear head while doing it, there’s no news just yet.

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