February 07, 2020

War-Separated Sisters Reunited after 78 Years


War-Separated Sisters Reunited after 78 Years
Soul sisters proving that years spent apart is just as number. Ministry of Internal Affairs | Dostup1
 

Two sisters separated by war 78 years ago have finally reunited.

The pair lost contact as teenagers in 1942, during their evacuation from the Battle of Stalingrad, the largest confrontation in World War II. Yet they say they never lost hope they would find each other.

Recently, the younger sister asked her daughter to make a request for information from the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Chelyabinsk Oblast about her sister “Rosa,” born in 1927. The police didn’t find a match, but they investigated further and discovered that someone born in 1926 named Rosalina had described a similar story on a television program. It turns out the elder sister had forgotten her sibling's exact name and age over the years.

The sisters, who are miraculously both still alive, and over 90 years old, shared a hug in Chelyabinsk.

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