November 12, 2021

Something Worse Than Detention


Something Worse Than Detention
The Russian version of the Chamber of Secrets. Photo by Sofia Chernova via the Official City Website of Novocherkassk

A mysterious hole in a pile of asphalt at a school in the city of Novocherkassk turned out to be something much more sinister: an abandoned burial chamber.

It was the gym teacher who first noticed the strange gap in the ground, which would upon further investigation prove to be some sort of catacomb dating back to at least the 1920s. Down inside the pit, they discovered rooms with vaults and doors, each marked with names and dates, ranging between 1927 to 1942. 

All renovations to the school grounds have been paused until they are able to conduct further research into this unusual historical find. Until then, very little is known about the purpose, time of construction, or historical value of this location. 

In a country so rich in history, it isn't rare to accidentally dig up some bits of the past, but this one is rather eerie. Perhaps this creepy find is just another reason to reimplement remote learning

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