January 26, 2020

Moscow's December Was Light on Sunshine



Moscow's December Was Light on Sunshine
96.3% of “daylight” hours looked like this. Deposit Photos | Gazeta.ru

Muscovites are no longer in the dark about the amount of sunlight they got in December: just eight hours, according to the director of the Hydrometeorological Center of Russia.

“That’s very little,” he added at a press conference, stating what should be obvious, except that there probably are people out there who need to be enlightened to the fact that Russia isn’t that dark and gloomy of a place, not usually at least.

But here’s some news to brighten your day, literally: Muscovites will get plenty of Vitamin D in the second half of January, which is supposed to be the hottest in history. (On second thought, maybe not such good news.)

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