May 02, 2022

Is Putin Ailing?


Is Putin Ailing?
Putin then and now. Ailing or just aging? You be the judge. Kremlin.ru

In recent days, it has been reported that President Vladimir Putin will be going under the knife – cancer surgery – and that he will temporarily relinquish his powers to his éminence grise Nikolai Patrushev, the conspiracy loving hawk and "former" FSB head.

This has led to a spate of conjectures about the state of Putin's health, including resurrection of past rumors that he has Parkinson's (most notably citing his jittery movements in this February video of his meeting with Belarusan President Aleksandr Lukashenko).

 

As further evidence, some also cited Putin's unsteadiness, biting of his lips, etc. in last month's Easter Service. Yet in recent speeches there have been no indications of unsteadiness or slurring of speech.

Meanwhile, others have speculated that the president's puffy face is a sign of steroid use - potentially to treat some form of inflammation – or perhaps just plastic surgery.

Finally, another line of conjecture has just arisen from publication of the below Kremlin photo of Putin in his office as he made his horrific announcement of the attack on Ukraine. Notice the strange nodules or swelling on Putin's left hand.

Putin in his office.
February 24, 2022 / Kremlin Press Service

One doctor contacted Russian Life to suggest that this might be evidence of some sort of systemic, fatal illness. Another we contacted offered that it looked most like Dupuyten's contracture, a non-fatal condition caused by knots of tissue forming under the skin and contracting the fingers.

Regardless, the lack of openness and transparency regarding the health of Russia's leaders is nothing new. The reality is we must simply wait and see what develops. Or doesn't.

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