October 05, 2020

Instant Karma on Sakhalin



Instant Karma on Sakhalin
Is this what people drive in Russia's Far East? We aren't sure. The RussianLife file

Karma can be pretty funny, until it happens to you. One resident of Sakhalin Island is probably pretty frustrated right now.

A 37-year-old fisherman contacted authorities about his missing car. After an investigation, officers tracked down a 29-year old, who, although he had stolen the car, didn't have it.

The younger man confessed that he had come across the car while intoxicated and, seeing that it was unlocked and that the keys were in the ignition, hopped in. That same evening, he sold the car and bought a new one, parking it outside his home that night.

The next morning, the new car was gone, allowing the criminal to enjoy his ill-gotten gains for less than 24 hours and lending hopeful credence to the idea that sometimes the universe just works out nicely.

Maybe the lesson here is that it's better to take the metro.

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