December 30, 2020

Heroes and Inflation



Heroes and Inflation

“A person who would personify the hero of 2020, according to Russians, is honest, decent, and fair (13%). Of the options proposed, Russians most often referred to the heroes of the year as doctors and medical workers (55%), as well as EMERCOM employees who save people in emergency situations (31%).”

Results from a poll by the All-Russian Center for the Study of Public Opinion (VTsIOM) on who Russians consider the heroes of 2020

Runner-Up Quote

“Rosstat calculates the inflation rate for a wide range of goods and services, of which there are more than 500. But that does not include all the goods that you consume every day. For example, plane tickets. This year they fell by double-digits, well, because people are not flying... But you do not notice it, you notice it when you go to the store.”

– Head of the Central Bank Elvira Nabiullina, on the reason why Russians feel there is higher inflation than the official indicators show
Tags: money
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