July 20, 2020

Case Closed on Dyatlov Pass?



Case Closed on Dyatlov Pass?
Mysterious deaths? A grainy black-and-white photo? Russia? Sign us up for the documentary! Public domain.

Russian officials formally closed their investigation into the Dyatlov Pass incident, claiming that the cause of the mysterious deaths of nine hikers was an avalanche, after reopening the case last year.

The report, delivered on July 11, seeks to conclude the case once and for all, attributing the strange circumstances of the hikers' demise to natural forces.

In February of 1959, nine students of the Ural State Technical University set out on a hiking expedition in the Ural Mountains, near Yekaterinburg. Their torn tent and frozen bodies were found a few weeks later, half-clothed and some with traumatic injuries. A Soviet inquest at the time found that an "unknown, compelling force" caused the group to leave their tents in the middle of a -40-degree-Celsius night, wearing only their underwear and socks, after which they died of hypothermia.

The avalanche theory explains away some of the mystery, but it's way less fun than some of the crazier ones out there.

We aren't saying it was aliens, but it was probably aliens.

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