November 11, 2020

Big Little Parody of Little Big's Hit


Big Little Parody of Little Big's Hit
These women did a great job doubling the hit group. Screen shot from ИК 9 один в один via YouTube

The Novosibirsk Oblast has an interesting event that was first implemented last year: a Doppelganger competition among incarcerated prisoners, known as “One to One” («Один в один»). This year a group of women from the IK-9 incarceration facility won the competition in the category of “Best Double,” with a parody of Little Big’s internet-hit “Uno.”

The participants themselves came up with the plan for the concert: they chose the song, sewed costumes, and redid their hairstyles to match those in the hit video clip. According to a press release from Novosibirsk’s prison system, “The contestants were quite creative in their approach to creating the copied performer’s image, having thought of everything: from clothes and hairstyles, to the use of unique gestures and facial expressions.” Another winner in the “Best Double” category was from IK-14 with “Johny B Good” from Back to the Future.

The winning “Uno” parody video has been making the rounds on social media, where the women are being praised for the outstanding performance.

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