February 26, 2022

Bellyaching in Belarus


Bellyaching in Belarus
What, these guys misbehave? The Russian Life files

Even though Russia and Belarus are allies, Belarusians were, reportedly, getting pretty sick of Russians in their backyards.

Thirty thousand Russian troops staging near the Ukrainian border prior to the recent invasion got a failing grade from local hosts, according to Radio Free Europe. Locals say that Russian troops were often drunk and disorderly, living in tents and littering throughout the forests. Like good Russians, they also had a habit of selling their diesel fuel, although we assume they did so in cans and drums rather than through pipelines.

Furthermore, troops apparently left trash and other military items around the rail depots they used to transport equipment and refused to get out of the way of oncoming trains operated by Belarusians. Tracks were strewn with garbage bags, snack packaging, and, of course, vodka bottles.

While Putin and Lukashenko remain buddies, residents of areas near where the exercises were conducted appeared vexed at having had such poor guests. Not that many neighboring countries are jumping at the opportunity to have Russians in their backyards, either.

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