November 06, 2021

A Not-Comprehensive List of Dostoyevsky 200th Events


A Not-Comprehensive List of Dostoyevsky 200th Events
You can always just go to the Dostoyevsky Museum in St. Petersburg on November 11 – if you have your QR code! Amanda Shirnina

On the eve of the 200th anniversary of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's birth (November 11, 2021), here is a totally not-comprehensive (incomprehensible?) list of Dostoyevsky events. If you are in St. Petersburg, where the famous novelist died and is buried but was not born, you will ironically not be able to celebrate him anywhere unless you have a QR code.

Stuff in Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin declared 2021 the Year of Dostoyevsky in Russia. Dostoyevsky Day has been celebrated in St. Petersburg every first Saturday in July for the past twelve years. You can even check it out online.

As for the upcoming birthday itself, the Theatre of the Nations in Moscow has a Dostoyevsky 200 page on which it proposes to "refresh the perception of classical works and the image of Fyodor Mikhailovich" and asks "which themes and plots of Dostoyevsky's are most relevant now, what stereotypes we encounter in the perception of a classic, what and how Fyodor Mikhailovich would write if he were our contemporary, and who would his heroes be today?" Dostoyevsky 200 events are taking place throughout November and December in Moscow. Check out the schedule, here.

The Dostoyevsky Museum in St. Petersburg, in the apartment where the writer died, opened a new permanent "literary exhibit" in September. From November 11–13, it will host the "International Conference 'Dostoyevsky and World Culture.' " The conference also celebrates the 50th anniversary of the opening of the museum. The museum sponsored a Dostoyevsky photo contest this summer whose winners will be revealed in November. Check out a dashing twenty-first-century Dostoyevsky, here.

Stuff in the United States

The North American Dostoyevsky Society's official blog is The Bloggers Karamazov. It hosts Digital Dostoevsky, a "computational text analysis project" of our hero's works. It has a list of bicentennial events, including a Virtual Birthday on the day (November 11). Check out the schedule, here. Anyone can watch videos of events that have already occurred.

The International Dostoevsky Society is running a five-minute video competition for Demons ahead of its 2022 conference; videos are due March 31, 2022.

An online reading of The Brothers Karamazov is happening with the "100 Days of The Brothers Karamazov" out of Iowa City, Iowa; they already started, but it's a doorstop of a book, and the fun will continue until December 10. If you live in the Iowa City/Cedar Rapids area, check out other Dostoyevsky events.

Wherever you find yourself on November 11, take a moment to remember the psychological master of literature, Fyodor Mikhailovich. (And just forget the knotty little fact that he was actually born on October 30; he deserves two birthdays anyway...) Here's to you, Dostoyevsky.

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