November 01, 2021

A Pen for Peace



A Pen for Peace
Dmitry Muratov Olaf Kosinsky

On October 10, for the first time since Mikhail Gorbachev in 1990, a Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to a Russian. Dmitry Muratov, the longtime editor in chief of the opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta (which apparently got seed funding from Gorbachev’s Nobel award), shared the award with Philipina journalist Maria Ressa.

Muratov, 60, has run the newspaper since 1995, apart from a two year hiatus. He was in charge when several of the newspaper’s reporters were killed, and dedicated the prize to them: Anna Politkovskaya, Igor Domnikov, Yury Shchekochikhin, Nastya Baburova, Stas Markelov and Natalia Estemirova.

Ironically, the Nobel’s announcement came one day after the investigation of Anna Politkovskaya’s 2006 murder was officially shelved: 15 years is the statute of limitations for murder under Russian law, and the mastermind behind her assassination in a stairwell will now never be brought to justice.


Digital Subscription Required

Get unlimited digital access for just $2 a month.

Don't have an account? signup

See Also

Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Gorbachev

The rises and falls of the esteem in which Russians have held Mikhail Gorbachev over the years have been dizzying.
Andrei Sakharov

Andrei Sakharov

Andrei Dmitriyevich Sakharov lived several completely different lives.
Andrei Sakharov

Andrei Sakharov

Andrei Sakharov was a paragon of dissent in the last years of the Soviet Union. On the 15th anniversary of his birth, we look back at his life and work.
Nobel Passions

Nobel Passions

For the people of the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, or the Russian Federation, it has always been exceptionally important who among their fellow citizens was awarded a Nobel Prize and who was not. We look back at 100 years of awards.
A Prophet and His Country

A Prophet and His Country

Thirty-five years ago this month, a little book was published that changed Russia forever. On the anniversary of the publication of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, we asked two esteemed observers to offer their views on the great writer's legacy.
Stalin's Scribe

Stalin's Scribe

I can’t imagine a cleverer or more perverse way of presenting “the first political biography” of Mikhail Sholokhov (1905-1975) than as if from the conscience-addled Sholokhov’s perspective.
Nobel Spirits

Nobel Spirits

Now for something completely different: an original Russian-themed crossword.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

Latest Posts


Our Contacts

Russian Life
PO Box 567
Montpelier VT 05601-0567

800-639-4301
802-223-4955