July 31, 2020

Why Did the Cats Cross the Street?



Why Did the Cats Cross the Street?
Cats in Krasnodar are breaking through animal stereotypes. Image by zeevveez via Flickr

You’ve probably heard the common expression “fighting like cats and dogs,” and, as we all know, the two species are not always on the friendliest of terms. Two cats in Krasnodar, however, bucked the trend when they helped an injured dog safely cross a street.

The event occurred during the night in Krasnodar and was witnessed by passing motorists. Video footage of the event shows the motorists slowing down as they see some sort of “delegation” on the road. The car slows as it approaches the scene, which clearly shows two cats leading an injured dog across the road. One of the witnesses on the video is overheard saying, “There is a whole delegation! Look, they are guarding the dog! It is apparently disabled.”

Russian media noted that this is not the first time cats have helped others. Last year, a cat in Columbia reportedly helped save a small child from falling down a set of stairs. More recently, a cat in the Japanese city of Toyama received an award for alerting passers-by to an unconscious elderly man who had fallen into an irrigational canal and lost consciousness.

 

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