March 25, 2022

Ill-Suited


Ill-Suited
A bold choice. Roscosmos

The yellow and blue flight suits used on Russia's latest mission to the International Space Station raised questions recently not because they were a colorful departure from the usually drab and utilitarian hue, but because their bright tone brought to mind the Ukrainian flag.

With widespread protests against Putin's war in Ukraine taking forms corporate and individual, subtle and obvious, some questioned whether the choice to turn from the usual blue uniforms had any sort of significance. The cosmonauts denied this, saying that they merely had a lot of yellow fabric lying around and thought it was about time to use it.

An image was published soon after showing one of the cosmonauts wearing something decidedly more patriotic, but the image of yellow-suited spacemen had already made its mark.

After all, with international cooperation reportedly as tight as it is on the ISS, it's probably better to avoid awkward conversations with your coworkers, especially when the cold vacuum of space is just outside.

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Kosmonaughties
  • April 21, 2021

Kosmonaughties

“A**holes. Superpowers do not behave that way." – On April 13, Roscosmos head Dmitriy Rogozin criticized the U.S. Department of State in a Tweet for failing to mention Yuri Gagarin in a Facebook post that commemorates 60 years since the first man flew in space. Such a pity to forget who got there first.
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