January 20, 2020

How to Become a Millionaire: Go Postal



How to Become a Millionaire: Go Postal
Not quite pelmeni, but dough nonetheless. Aldric van Gaver via Flickr

A recent Russian Postal Service press release revealed statistics on lottery winnings for 2019.

According to the release, 171 Russians received over a million rubles ($16,200) in winnings. 362 won somewhere between 500,000 and one million. The largest prize last year, about three million rubles, was won by a resident of the Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug.

Perhaps now is the time to play the Russian lotto: earlier this month, a Moscow woman reportedly won a billion rubles ($16.2 million) on her birthday. Despite inflation, that's nothing to sneeze at. Maybe she'll be smart enough to put her winnings up for sale.

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