July/August 2018 Current Moscow Time: 11:16:09
22 August 2018


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Friday, January 26, 2018

Moon Colonies and Molotov Modernism

by Alice E.M. Underwood
Eccentrics, Animals, and Artsy Art

1. That’s no moon – it’s a space colony on the moon. If you’re not happy with the lot Earth gave you, you can now become a citizen of Asgardia, the first extraterrestrial state. Founded by former defense industry leader Igor Ashurbeyli, the “space kingdom” already outsizes Kiribati and Andorra, with 170,000 Asgardians who signed up for citizenship online. Ashurbeyli is certain it’s only a matter of time before Asgardia attains UN membership and establishes its moon colony.

2. Real modern art is flammable. That was the idea behind a Russian artist’s postmodern statement of throwing Molotov cocktails at the Tate Modern Art Gallery in London. And it wasn’t just because “Alexander Art,” as he calls himself, thought the gallery wasn’t modern enough. He was protesting “tatecide,” his catchphrase for the Tate’s alleged anti-art attitude, as he claims that security guards destroyed his installation-in-progress outside the gallery. The Molotovs left no mark on the building, but the act is an artistic statement in itself. That’s how modern art works, right?

3. The Don Juan of Siberian Leopards is on the prowl. The world’s most endangered big cat, the Amur Leopard, has seemed to be on its ninth life for awhile. However, researchers were excited to see a male leopard, aptly named Lord, courting three female leopards in their nature reserve in eastern Russia. Researchers previously thought that these leopards only took one partner, but clearly Lord is taking one for the team in order to save his species. So much for leopards not changing their spots.

In Odder News
  • Geography goes bestial: check out these historical European maps that put the cartoon in cartography with depictions of Russia as a bear (duh), an octopus, and even a steamroller.

  • When Russian aviation cadets twerked an homage to the classic “Satisfaction,” their superiors were far from satisfied. While a public outcry has saved them from expulsion, they still face a dressing-down – or rather, dressing-up, as the lack of clothes was the problem in the first place.

  • It’s that time of year again when the outside world wonders whether Russians are crazy for jumping into icy water in January – but are also in awe of their cold tolerance and dedication to observing Epiphany. (By the way, the two shirtless men in a row is just a coincidence).   

Quote of the Week

“In my lifetime, I want to create a permanent settlement on the Moon and fly there. Everything else is just adventurism, insofar as the issue isn’t even technology but physiology...That’s why any talk about Mars is nothing more than idle chatter. I mean, yes you could buy yourself a one-way ticket, but that’s it. The Moon, on the other hand, why that’s something tangible, understandable, and nearby.”
—Igor Ashurbeyli, former head of a Russian defense conglomerate and current aspiring head of government in space, on his desired establishment of the nation on the Moon.

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