Special Projects

Posts related to special book projects and other article series of interest.

Piter's People

Piter's People – Natalia Kapiturova

Piter's People – Natalia Kapiturova

We begin a new project, in which readers meet regular St. Petersburgers, to learn about their lives and their favorite places in the Northern Palmyra. First up: coffee!
Piter's People - Ekaterina Khozatskaya

Piter's People - Ekaterina Khozatskaya

Ekaterina is an artist who is constantly sketching in St. Petersburg bars. Her hobby led to the creation of the Instagram blog “Between the Bars,” where she captures the city's bohemian atmosphere.
Piter's People – Sergey Goorin

Piter's People – Sergey Goorin

St. Petersburg is often thought to be a gray city, as it only has about 75 sunny days each year. Still, photographer Segrey Goorin finds inspiration here for his black and white photography, capturing street life, extraordinary locals and numerous parties.   
Piter's People - Katya Kotlyar

Piter's People - Katya Kotlyar

Graphic designer, traveler, instagram explorer, Katya Kotlyar knows her home city inside out, and sees it as an artist would, as a beautiful backdrop for living.
Piter's People – Nikolay Predtechensky

Piter's People – Nikolay Predtechensky

St. Petersburg was founded in 1703 as a port on the Baltic Sea, and about 10% of its surface area is water. So we meet a boat rental company owner and find out the best place for pizza in the city.

Everyday Russia

Moscow

Moscow

Ekaterina Klyueva takes us to the capital, the center of empire, a city everyone knows but no one every sees in full: Moscow!
Krasnodar

Krasnodar

Olya Virich takes us to the Kuban, more specifically Krasnodar, the capital of Russia's breadbasket.
Yekaterinburg

Yekaterinburg

Photographer Daria Kozinova takes us on a tour of the capital of the Urals: Yekaterinburg.
Smolensk

Smolensk

Irina Novikova explains the resilience of Smolensk, its legends, ghosts, churches and fortress. Oh, and why people stop by a city park to stroke the genitals of a bronze deer.
Kandalaksha

Kandalaksha

Teacher Ilona Isayeva shares with us some of the charms of Kandalaksha, a small industrial town on the White Sea.
Mariy El

Mariy El

Nikolai Gontar leads us on a trip to the Republic of Mariy El, home to layered pancakes and some very unusual architecture.
Uglich

Uglich

Kristina Brazhnikova, who last week took us around her home city of Voronezh, this week takes us to Uglich.
Kaluga

Kaluga

Photographer Svetlana Tarasova takes us to the heart of Russia: Kaluga. Here, along the Oka River,  the Russian space program began. 
Mtsensk

Mtsensk

Pavel Byrkin is a photo editor in Mtsensk, south of Moscow. This is his view of his city.
Chuvashia

Chuvashia

Ivan Mikhailov takes us deep into the heart of Chuvashia and its capital city of Cheboksary.
Kaliningrad

Kaliningrad

Alexander Podgorchuk takes us to Russia's westernmost city, Kaliningrad.
Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky

Maria Plotnikova acquaints us with Tchaikovsky. No, not the composer, the town named for him in Siberia's Perm Krai.

The Children of 1917

Zenly Down the Road

Zenly Down the Road

For all the romanticism commonly associated with world travel, the brutal reality is that it is often a very un-romantic undertaking to move the meat that is our bodies around in the world.
Scenes from the Road

Scenes from the Road

Photographic proof that all we have done on this trip is work, work, work... and nap.
Two Samara Stories

Two Samara Stories

In which we move east to Samara, on the Volga River, and meet two centenarians living alone in very different ways.
The Last Hero

The Last Hero

A train ride, a war hero, sunflower fields, and the Loch Ness monster - just another day on the road for the Children of 1917 team.
The Orphan

The Orphan

Given the historical and personal realities she faced, Maria Konyayeva was very unlikely to live to 100 when she was born in 1917. And yet here she is.
Of Rivers, Mines, and a Lake

Of Rivers, Mines, and a Lake

Two days in Irkutsk and one on Baikal, where we meet a soft-spoken mechanic and visit two very different tourist destinations.
First Love

First Love

On the importance of coffee, academicians, a museum, a rooster, the harvesting of turf, and collectivization.
Stage 2: Siberia or Bust

Stage 2: Siberia or Bust

A second, more intensive phase of the Children of 1917 project has begun. Seatbelts fastened? Poyekhali!
A One Act Play in Nine Scenes

A One Act Play in Nine Scenes

Any good expedition has its lighter moments. We have collected nine such scenes from recent days into a one-act play for your enjoyment.
Countdown to Departure

Countdown to Departure

So, what exactly have we been doing in the two months since the successful closure of our crowdfunding for this project?

Russian Patriots

Valeria Miloslavskaya

Valeria Miloslavskaya

Tea Sommelier, St. Petersburg I am a patriot of my country. Really, this is a very strange question. Can I have a moment? Because I truly love my country, my relatives, and they live here. And therefore I adore my country. I cannot tear myself away from my relatives, my work, my friends.
Nadezhda Alexeyeva

Nadezhda Alexeyeva

Director and artistic director of the Maly Theater, Veliki Novgorod Patriotism is a very personal feeling, just like religion. I don’t want to rank myself among the patrios that yell from every television, in all the mass media, that this is some kind of requirement. Yet recently I have been asking myself this question quite often. It has simply slashed me, because I pose this question to myself and answer that “yes, of course, I am a patriot and reside in that sphere of culture that is my motherland, and a reside among a sphere of people that truly comprises for me my small motherland.” From these small things the whole of everything is created. And my understanding of “motherland,” I repeat, is for me mainly tied to the people and and our culture. Therefore, yes. And in this regard, if I were answering a question about religion, I would also answer unequivocally. Unequivocal in the sense not becasue I don’t belive in God, but because this too is a very personal question. And nevertheless, I answer it, “Yes, of course.” But I don’t want to rank myself among patriots who yell about Russian lands. I want to rank myself among patriots who speak of Russian culture. First and foremost, this is people, our asset, human and rich. Оf course it is our people.
Leonid Baluyev

Leonid Baluyev

Blacksmith, Novaya Ladoga I am not a patriot. I am a Jehovah’s Witness. I serve God.
Yakov Somov

Yakov Somov

Co-founder and general director of Lektorium MOOC project, St. Petersburg In general, it's rude to ask a person if he is a patriot or not. I am a patriot of public education. But does that mean I am a patriot? I don't know. I work in my country, I work for it. I also work for the whole world. Yes, I am probably a patriot. In my circles, it is not proper to ask someone if they are a patriot or not. You either do good work, or don't do good work. I do good work for my country, including for the place where I studied. I graduated from this school in 2000, and have been working here for seven years. And so I am investing in the children who study here. And I work with the teachers who teach here. You've caught me off guard. You have, probably, a very well-formed question here.
Alexandra Turchenkova

Alexandra Turchenkova

Vocal student at the Gnesin Academy of Music, Moscow I am now am studying in the Gnesin Academy, an academy which has a really huge musical tradition. And for a musician, there should be no limits, a musician should create and be capable of expressing herself. And I, of course, am lucky to have been born in Russia, and to know Russian, to be able to interpret Russian music, because I can feel it. I feel that the main patriotism of a musician is to be able to perform Russian music. But, of course, to always seek to widen her horizons and be engaged in music more generally, that is in its broadest sense.
Ksenia Tsukareva

Ksenia Tsukareva

Deputy Director for Marketing and PR, Sochi Hockey Club I can call myself a patriot, because I am committed to my family, my business. I give my full 100 percent not because that is what is needed, but because that is what I want. Because I truly believe that if it comes from within, then it is much stronger than any affixed stamp of citizenship or responsibility. Patriotism is that which comes from within.
Larisa Safronova

Larisa Safronova

Editor of the newspaper Elektron-TV, Krymsk I can say that I love Russia. But patriot, non-patriot, there are so many definitions of this word, both as a curse and as praise. Therefore I love my motherland and divide it into rulers and people, into what I have loved since childhood: school, parents, the city where I was born and raised, and in which I now live. That is everything that I love. But to be a patriot, does that mean to defend the national interests of one’s country? If they are just, then yes, I will defend it to the last. IF not, then I will also defend it. Perhaps that’s simply how we are built. Mine, ours. That’s all.
Marina Kozlova

Marina Kozlova

Jurist, single mother, mother of Lev and Marta, Moscow I cannot call myself a patriot. I believe [the author Sergei] Dovlatov said something about uniting people on the basis of nationality or the place where they live – that it is at the very least stupid. People should unite around and be proud of other sorts of things. I am not a patriot.
Valentin Svatovoy

Valentin Svatovoy

Owner of Valentine’s bakery, Petrozavodsk Unequivocally. There’s no need to shy from this. I am a patriot of the land where I live, because I am proud of what was done before me, and I need to do things that those who come after me will be proud of.
Andrei Pletnev

Andrei Pletnev

Professional yachtsman, boat owner, Novorossiysk Naturally, I can call myself a patriot. A patriot of my country, a patriot of the sport of sailing. And I make every effort so that everything I love lives, grows and prospers.
Vladimir Simonov

Vladimir Simonov

Feldsher (primary care physician). Krasniye Stanki village I don't get it, why a patriot? I'm a typical person, doing his work honesty with respect to his people. Whether this is a patriot or not, I cannot say. 
Sergei Troyanovsky

Sergei Troyanovsky

Historian and deputy director of the Kremlin Museum, Veliky Novgorod This is a very difficult question. Because of “Country or Death,” as Fidel Castro said, when he conquered Cuba. To be a patriot does not mean to hate other nations, other peoples. To be a patriot means to love one’s own. I love my country a great deal. I am by birth half Belarusan and half Russian and have many relatives in Ukraine. And I cannot say that I am a patriot of the Russian Federation of today. I love people in general. That is what a patriot is, in my opinion. 

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