Sep/Oct 2018 Current Moscow Time: 18:53:07
24 September 2018


  The world’s biggest country, in a magazine. Since 1956.

Jan/Feb 2004

Jan/Feb 2004

14: How Many Lenins Does it Take?
Dasha Demourova
60 years ago, the first statue to Lenin was unveiled in the Soviet Union. They soon multiplied to unfathomable numbers, and the tide was only turned back when the Soviet Union collapsed. We look back at the sometimes odd history of Lenin worship.
Russian Calendar

16: Ioseliani
Dasha Demourova
An intimate biography of the Georgian filmmaker Otar Ioseliani, who turns 70 on February 2, 2004. A filmography is also included.
Russian Calendar

20: Summer Camps
Where to send the kids for summer camp? How about a Russian language camp? We offer a first-ever listing of some of the many (we were surprised how many) options around the country.
Study Russia

22: May the Waters Be With You
Nick Allen
With roots stretching back over a millennium, the Russian banya (steam bath) is stitched tightly into the fabric of the Russian soul. We asked an intrepid journalist to help us unravel the mysteries, and sent him on a tour of Moscow's finest public bani.
Features

28: Siege
Polina Fomina
It was one of the most horrifying and heroic episodes of the last century. Sixty years ago this January, the 900-day Siege of Leningrad was finally broken. We take you back for a look at what daily life was like for average Leningraders.
Features

33: Daily Bread
Darra Goldstein
A page-long sidebar to our story on the Leningrad Siege, in which we look back at how people fed themselves during the horrific blockade.
Features

34: Just a Minute
Lynn Visson
An offbeat look at the different ways Russians and Americans think about, and talk about, time.
Survival Russian

35: Primorye: Cars and Crime
Ilya Stogoff
In the third installment of Ilya Stogoff's travels in the Russian Far East, the author explores Russia's Eastern Crime Capital (Khabarovsk), and has a first-hand encounter with "the criminal element."
Travel

40: Payback Time
Maxim Blant
Russia faces the same demographic presures as other industrialized nations: a declining workforce, rising numbers of retirees, and a desire to lower taxes. To meet the challenge, the Russian government is privatizing a part of pensions. Sort of.
Features

44: May the Earth Be As Soft As Feathers
Laura Williams
When a long-time member of a small Russian village passes on, there are rituals aplenty to observe.
Notes from a Russian Village

46: Winds From the East
Jay Coote
Russia produces some of the most talented classical musicians in the world. We profile a youthful quintet that seeks to break into the highly competitive US market -- a difficult task, even with the esteemed name of the Russian National Orchestra behind you.
Features

51: The Magical World of the Russian Circus
Masha Nordbye
It is the world's largest circus organization and one of its oldest. We asked a noted circus-phile to take us behind the flaps of Russia's Big Top, to look at the fascinating history of this 210-year-old institution.
Features

60: Stalin, Siberia and more
Paul E. Richardson
Where we review a new book on Stalin by Zhores and Roy Medvedev, and one on Siberia, by Fiona Hill and Clifford Gaddy. Plus some shorter notes on books on everything from submarines to Petersburg to Marina Tsvetaeva.
Under Review

62: A Winter Ferment
Lina Rozovskaya
One of Russia's most typical winter dishes is fermented cabbage. You'll want to rush out to the store and buy a few heads to make this dish when you are done reading our recipe.
Cuisine

64: January 27, 1944
A rare photo of the salut Leningrad gave itself upon its liberation on this day, plus a translation of Akhmatova's poem of the same name.
Post Script