Sep/Oct 2018 Current Moscow Time: 18:38:42
19 September 2018


  The world’s biggest country, in a magazine. Since 1956.

Prohibitionism

Author: Maria Antonova


July/Aug 2014
Social Issues
Page 16   ( 2 pages)


Summary: A look at the recent prohibitions on smoking and foul language.


Extract:

The Russian smoking ban, which enters a new, stricter stage this summer, has already had 30,000 Muscovites fined over the last year (see Post Script).

The law has banned smoking near metro stations, on children’s playgrounds, and in train stations, with violators facing fines of R500-1,500.

The second stage of the ban, which came into force June 1, further bans smoking in restaurants, hotels, and trains, among other places.

The ban has been lauded by non-smokers, derided by smokers, and ridiculed by both – plenty of people are still seen puffing in places where smoking is no longer allowed, raising the question of just how enforceable the restrictions are. It is not clear, for example, how smokers are expected to endure a train journey of several days (in a country like Russia, a regular occurrence) if they cannot smoke on the train or on the train platforms.

To read more, follow the "Purchase Back Issue" link from the full story listing for this issue.