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19 September 2018


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Author

Marina Latysheva

6 contributions found for Russian Life and/or Chtenia.

Marina Latysheva Marina Latysheva graduated from Moscow State University's journalism faculty in 1997. She writes primarily on terrorism and issues of national security. She is the Terrorism and Culture Editor for agentura.ru, which specializes in national security and intelligence issues.


Culture Wars

Russian Life: Jan/Feb 2009
The Kremlin's reassertion of control over the mass media has gotten plenty of press. Much less has been written about its forays into the arts - specifically, how the Kremlin is seeking to influence film, literature and art. We decided to look into it.
Author: Marina Latysheva
Translator: Craig Bell
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Six Years That Shook the World

Russian Life: Jan/Feb 2008
In which we look back at the heroes and Herods of the era of perestroika, tracking many of them down, to see where life has taken them these last 20 years.
Author: Marina Latysheva
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Spetsluzhb Goes to the Movies

Russian Life: Nov/Dec 2006
The FSB (heir to the KGB) has been influencing Russia’s recent film releases. Propaganda is new again.
Author: Marina Latysheva
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Watering the Seeds of Fascism

Russian Life: Nov/Dec 2006
What happened in the Karelian town of Kondopoga in September, and is it a sign of things to come?
Author: Marina Latysheva
Illustrations/Images: Mitya Aleshkovsky
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Non-Governmental Spies

Russian Life: May/Jun 2006
A new Russian law on non-governmental organizations has many in Russia and the West worried about State interference. For instruction, we look at how a similar law has been implemented in neighboring Belarus.
Author: Marina Latysheva
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Chernobyl: 20 Years On

Russian Life: Mar/Apr 2006
On April 26, 1986, the Number 4 reactor core at Chernobyl exploded, spewing radiation across Ukraine, Belarus, Russia and much of Europe. It is still the worst nuclear power plant disaster in history. What lessons has Russia learned, and what is the current state of the Russian nuclear power industry?
Author: Marina Latysheva
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